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Female Adventure Tour Leaders at PEAK DMC

2 Minute Read

With diversity and inclusion at the forefront of everything PEAK DMC does, in March 2017 they set a goal to double the number of female tour leaders globally by 2020 – a target that they achieved six months ahead of schedule.

When this target was first set, PEAK DMC had 153 female tour leaders around the world. By June 2019, they had more than 300 female tour leaders, and today they are proud to say that nearly 30% of their tour leaders worldwide are now female.

So, what’s next? With this target achieved PEAK DMC are now working on their next initiative. By 2022, they aim to double the number of female porters globally who assist travellers on mountain hikes in Tanzania, Peru and Nepal.

PEAK DMC’s first group of female porters, who will make the Inca Trail this year

Increasing opportunities for women in tourism where they were previously limited is an important issue for the travel industry. While these targets may not be difficult in many countries, in traditional societies such as India and Morocco recruiting women is a much greater challenge.

Experienced leaders in training and recruiting, PEAK DMC have overcome a number of cultural and logistical barriers to achieve their targets. In one example, in the traditional environment of Peru, PEAK DMC visited women in their villages to guide them through the full porter training process, setting up separate training days and putting in a considerable amount of planning and time to ensure that that all the women felt comfortable and safe while on the Inca Trail. This year, they were proud to introduce their first group of female porters who will make the Inca Trail this year.

There are a number of challenges that the travel industry faces and still needs to overcome in regard to gender equality. At PEAK DMC, they are doing their part to make this happen, helping women in countries all over the world to build careers that they have traditionally been denied – whether by societal norms, family pressure, or simply the lack of opportunities.

Voices From The Field – ATTA is providing this space for the benefit of our members for building awareness within our community. The views and opinions expressed in this column are not necessarily ATTA’s, nor do we endorse them by their publication.

Voices From The Field – ATTA is providing this space for the benefit of our members for building awareness within our community. The views and opinions expressed in this column are not necessarily ATTA’s, nor do we endorse them by their publication.

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